Apr 112014
 

What seems like anger, especially unreasonable anger, is often not anger at all.  Other elements will go into anger to cover up intolerable pain. The ‘call to action’ that is inherent in anger is sometimes actually the call to avoid being honest about what we are really feeling.  That’s pain avoidance; that’s not really anger.

Read “Not Really Anger” (2-page pdf)

Apr 112014
 

Healthy planning and decision-making have a number of different aspects worth exploring in detail.  The most basic differentiation worth considering is between the two primary Wood element questions, #1 “Where am I going?” and #2 “How am I going to get there?”

Read “Plans and Decisions”  (5-page pdf)

Apr 112014
 

It’s not for nothing that, in the Chinese calendar/clock meridian system, the Gallbladder is from 11 p.m. to 1 a.m.  It’s the darkness at midnight, and by extension it’s the darkness of an-hour-before-midnight and also the shift to an-hour-after-midnight.  It’s the pivotal hour. Particularly, it’s the pivotal hour of darkness.  It’s the pivotal moment, at the darkest moment.  It’s a fairly subtle awareness, to notice a pivotal moment in the midst of all that darkness.

 

Read “Introduction to Gall Bladder:  Pivotal Moments”   (4-page pdf)

Feb 212014
 

What is the ‘will’ to live? It’s something very deeply connected with a life of deep happiness. It’s something very connected to what makes us decide to keep on going for it. Stephen Cowan, pediatrician-sage, says it’s more accurate to translate it as ‘willingness.’ How’s your willingness to live? Do you have a strong willingness to live – or not really?

 

Read “A Life of Deep Happiness”  (7-page pdf)

Feb 192014
 

Worksheet

1. A healthy HM is able to both give and receive love. These abilities are challenged in situations of emotional pain and heartbreak. What is it important to do in these situations?

2. There are two parts of the HM: the Xin Zhu (the part that gives love) and the Xin Bao Luo (the part that lets love in). If you say “I love you,” to someone, and that goes right in, which part of the HM is open?

3. A healthy HM requires both adaptability and commitment. Adjusting to the fluctuating levels of warmth in a relationship is an example of which characteristic of a healthy HM?

4. Why is the video of Janis Joplin singing “Cry Baby” a great example of a healthy heart mediator?

Feb 192014
 

Quiz

1. When you are hurt and injured in love, it is best to:

2. It is painful when you find someone with whom you think could have a great relationship, and they reject this relationship. Why might this situation occur?

3. Which of the following are true of both the HM and the Liver?

4. The HM is made up of

5. When is it appropriate to shut down in love?

6. There is a story in the lecture of a client whose husband had an affair and then begged to be taken back. The client refused to do this, and has not had a partner for the past 30 years. This is an example of:

7. A healthy HM requires

8. What do Jesus and Janis Joplin have in common?

9. The difference between the Heart and the Heart Mediator is like the difference between

10. Cutting people off due to a feeling of injured honor and pride is problem with which element?

Feb 192014
 

Exit-entry blocks deal with the space between two meridians.  It is a radical shift, and a significant gap, between the ending of one meridian and the beginning of the next.

Listen to “Exit-Entry Blocks:  Intro”  (length 9:55)

 

This material, along with “Exit-Entry Blocks:  Spleen-Heart” is also available as an online CEU course for 1 NCCAOM PDA point.

Click here for the online CEU course “Exit-Entry Blocks: Intro, and SP-HT Block”

 
You may also be interested in the following other Exit-Entry block materials:

Exit-Entry Blocks:  Spleen-Heart

Exit-Entry Blocks:  Kidney-Heart Mediator

Exit-Entry Blocks:  Liver-Lung

Jan 072014
 

Upper Leg:

 

BL 50 & 51

BL 36/50 CHENG FU Receive Support and BL 37/51 YIN MEN Gate of Abundance are two main points for being able to access a basic sense of trust in life to support us.  Here is where we physicalize in our musculature all those issues of “Can I actually trust the Tao, the ocean, my life, even my own chair, to support me? Or am I so tight in these areas that I am actually incapable of noticing when I am supported?”

BL-50-and-BL-51 (3-page pdf)

Dec 012013
 

Excerpt:  “The bladder is the night watchman. Pang guang is the word for bladder in Chinese. Pang is a vesseled space, a container. Guang is in a lot of GB points, and is an alternate name for GB 24 sun and moon. The character either means a person carrying a torch, or a person with their head on fire, in which case they may be a human torch. It is translated as light, radiance, brilliance, light bearer.

That is the bladder: pang: a vesseled space, guang, light. It’s a night light. It’s the light in the darkness. It’s the stars in the sky. It’s the campfire in the dark. It’s all about light in winter.”

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Nov 162013
 

Lung 6 KONG ZUI, xi cleft point of the Lung, is like an emergency override for being chronically either too open or too shut.  It brings flexible intelligence to the opening and closing system so that it’s not stuck open, or stuck shut, or frankly, stuck in any position even if it’s half open / half shut.  Our skin needs to be able to breathe.  Whenever anything changes in the interior or the exterior, our whole pattern of the relationship between interior and exterior needs to be able to change fluidly, intelligently, freely.

Read “Lung 6″  (8-page pdf)

Nov 162013
 

There’s so much that festers and grows dark and problematic if we’re stuck in Late Summer and “I caaaare about you” and can never move on to the place of saying, “You know what, the hell with your itty bitty boo boo. It’s not important.”

Read “Introduction to CO, & BL 30″  (7-page pdf)

Nov 162013
 

Autumn is a time of putting aside our individual passions in order to conform with circumstances. Summer is ending.  The light is fading.  We are going to be heading into close quarters.  We will not be able to be outdoors running around all the time.  We are going to be cooped up together on the inside.  What does it take to be primarily indoor people for a while?

Read “Introduction to Metal, Part 1:  Downbearing and Pacification  –  Put Your Toys Away”  (6-page pdf)

 

Reality is a fabric that is either whole and seamless, or made of an infinite number of threads. There are no words in the oneness. Once you start speaking, you live somewhere else entirely. This is what the number 4, the Anterior Heaven numerology of Metal, grapples with.

Read “Introduction to Metal, Part 2:  The Name on the Box”  (10-page pdf)

 

These are the places inside ourselves where the outside world cannot follow; the Emperor goes alone to the western chamber. The chamber of the west, associated with the left atrium, is the place where the Emperor goes in complete privacy and solitude, to kneel and receive from the heavens above the blood filled with oxygen from the lung.

Read “Introduction to Metal, Part 3:  The Western Chamber”  (8-page pdf)

 

What is grief?  When it comes right down to it, grief is a connection to heaven that has gotten too small. Grief is a too-small connection to heaven that says “I see perfection and beauty in THIS, and THIS is no longer here.”

Read “Introduction to Metal, Part 4:  Grief to Impartiality”  (6-page pdf)

Nov 132013
 

Excerpt:  “The small intestine is not only the primary seat of our perceptual/cognitive clarity; it is also in herbal medicine perhaps the means by which the herbs are able to “speak” to the whole bodymindspirit. This class is an opportunity to listen to Debby Shapiro questioning Thea Elijah on treating the small intestine with Chinese herbs.  Some of Debby’s questions include:

1) The small intestine seems to have the ability to take over a persons perceptions of reality and run wild, preventing them from connecting with their heart consistently and detouring them repeatedly often in rather destructive ways. How can you bring the small intestine back into its role as servant to the heart herbally?

2) What are the benefits and draw backs of treating the small intestine indirectly (via balancing /cooling the heart and stomach primarily)?

NOTE: Although the material covered in this class has tremendously rich diagnostic significance for acupuncturists as well as herbalists, the specifically herbal material presented in this class is intended to be used only by licensed herbalists. A full working knowledge of Chinese diagnostics and common standards of herbal prescription will be assumed. Prescribing herbs without sufficient education is dangerous.”

3 Core Knowledge NCCAOM® PDA Point / CEU

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Nov 122013
 

Excerpt:  “This is an emotionally challenging (and liberating) doosey of a lecture on love and sex and many of the other forms of madness that we unwittingly bring into the mix, like jing thievery.”

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Nov 052013
 

Excerpt: “I have been very interested in: What is the client-practitioner relationship anyway, and what does it have to do with healing, and what are some of its parameters and funny habits in its off-time? … You’re one of the first clients with whom I actually felt like I was doing something I could call healing, and I moved through student clinic and out into my practice on my own with you in many ways on my leading edge. And then I watched you become practitioner, and felt or sensed how that changed our relationship, for you to also be practitioner to others. I’m interested in that; I’m interested in what it is that we are doing.”

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Nov 012013
 

Excerpt:  “This transcript from the Whole Heart Acupuncture series is an in-depth look at how we create a sure foundation for our life on an ongoing basis.”

1.5 Core Knowledge NCCAOM® PDA Points
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Oct 312013
 

Excerpt:“I gave a lot of thought as to the order in which to do these points, and my inner state was a total portrait of the pathological emotion of Earth. It was a state of Si, deliberation and mulling. I was like a washing machine on the inside—which, by the way, is the difference between worry and fear. Water people in fear are like a refrigerator. It’s like sitting there next to a fridge and it’s going mmmmmmmm (low hum). With worrying Earth people it’s like sitting next to a washing machine–kajoonk, kajoonk, kajoonk. There’s a churn cycle, and then they’ll soak for a little while, and then they’re back to brrooo, and then the spin cycle. It’s worse when it’s like a washing machine with a couple sneakers in it. Then they go on tilt and you’ve got to pull out the sneaker. That’s when you disperse.”

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Oct 162013
 

Dear Friends,

In our monthly Whole Heart Connection group that meets in Portland Oregon, we tap into the treasure trove of Thea’s recorded and transcribed teachings (available on her website).  The facilitator prepares one or two exercises for the meeting and we go for it!  We experiment, we report our experience if we want to, we connect inside ourselves and with each other.  And usually we feel great when we’re done.

We rotate facilitators so that people who have been studying this work with Thea for some time can get experience in leading the exercises, as well as coming up with new exercises. The group is a collaborative experience as we step into Heart Space together and hone our skills and capacity for living from the Heart in every circumstance of our lives.

For the past year we have been meeting on the second Monday of the month. If other evenings work better for you, please let me know.  We may also consider some Saturday morning sessions when we may be a little less tired and have more time to explore deeply.   Doors will open at 6:30 pm to allow some time to relax, have some tea and cookies, before we start our practice.  The meeting is held from 7 – 9 pm.

We hope that you can join us whenever you are able.  RSVP is always appreciated.  For location, please call Nanette at 503-452-4103.

Oct 152013
 

Excerpt:  (From the Intro:)  Exit-entry blocks deal with the space between two meridians.  It is a radical shift, and a significant gap, between the ending of one meridian and the beginning of the next.

(From SP-HT Block:)  Where does thought end and insight begin?  What kind of mindfulness supports direct knowing, and what kind of mind-”fullness” squashes it?  How does worry become trust, and how does shock become an opportunity to open to a greater reality?  These and other questions are addressed in this audio clip describing the Spleen-Heart Exit-Entry Block treatment.”

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Oct 142013
 

Excerpt:  “The Kidney meridian’s journey through the middle burner and its emergence above the diaphragm at Kidney 22 is a long, dark wordless journey finally opening into light at the end of the tunnel in the region of Heart Mediator 1.  Here in the space between our solitary winter sojourn and the ability to share in warmth, love and intimacy is the terrain of the Kidney-Heart Mediator Exit-Entry zone.  Does what I have lived through in silence prevent me from speaking?  Does what I know of love from my past relationships overshadow what I know love can be?  What does it mean to be strong, and also able to melt in the arms of the beloved?  These and other questions are addressed in this audio clip describing the Kidney-Heart Mediator Exit-Entry Block treatment.”

1 Core Knowledge NCCAOM® PDA Point

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Oct 132013
 

Excerpt: “Between Liver 14 and Lung 1 is a long inner journey between hope and acceptance, between dreams and disappointments, between plans and the actual circumstances of our lives.  This lecture is an exploration of the acupuncture points that are charged with the task of keeping this space open, and allowing us to have a very different relationship to time, space, circumstances and the pacing of both our individual and collective progression through the epochs and eras of our lives.”

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Oct 052013
 

Excerpt: “For clients that are seductive for whatever reasons (having very deficient fire and desperately, desperately needing to be loved especially if they are in a position of self exposure), keep on giving them all the love they are looking for but do it only from left wrist Fire, from the Heart. Let them know that they are absolutely perfect, beautiful, holy, lovable, and not G-d’s mistake.”

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Sep 252013
 

Excerpt: “One of the greatest benefits of practicing Chinese medicine in contemporary America is that when the insights of two different cultures come together, the results can be revolutionary and startling. Contrast provides opportunity for perspective and growth; but it can also provide opportunity for misunderstanding, conflict and alienation. How do we work with difference—of thought, of paradigm, of culture, of perception?”

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Sep 152013
 

The Earth element in the legs is about grounding and applying to practical life everything that we have explored in our personal inner process in the torso.  The experience of Earth in the torso portion of the ST and SP meridians generally applies to how we feel about life once we have taken it into us, i.e. our internal personal experience of being nourished by life.  Then we bring that accumulated sense of life experience out to the limbs, into our direct engagement with the outside world.  You can do all the fancy points you like on the torso or on the head, but how do you create change in how the person actually lives their life? When we treat Earth points on the thighs, we engage the power of practicality.  It is such a revelation to heady people, to feel Thigh Power!

Read “Earth Points on the Thigh” (6-page pdf)

Sep 122013
 

This class is a fundamental introduction to 5 Element Treatment Protocols for acupuncturists who are new to the 5 element approach.

Excerpt: “The Constitutional Factor (CF) is the primary cause not only of the client’s illness, but of the client’s health. It is like a first domino in a long chain reaction. This domino did not fall down long ago in the past, leaving us the pieces to pick up now; it is continuing to fall down potentially every moment of the client’s life, thus every time knocking right back down again every domino that we pick up. This is why, although symptomatic treatments may bring dramatic immediate results, the effects are relatively temporary. The root disharmony will keep on producing a chain reaction of illness, until it begins to heal.

Healing is not a removal of illness; it is journey toward virtue, or greater and greater alignment with Tao. Once the CF is oriented towards this journey of healing, this too has a profound chain reaction effect. If, at any time, there is any way that we can access the deep power of the core virtue to help shift another Element towards virtue, this is always preferable, and most likely to be an enduring shift.”

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Sep 112013
 

Excerpt:“What I am here to speak about is the flipping of coins; the welcome chaos, the open chance and instability of the universe; and how this allows free will to overcome determinism in the healing of body mind and spirit in Chinese Medicine.”

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Aug 142013
 

Earth’s capacity for pleasure is not the same as Fire’s joyous excitement.  The easiest way to describe the difference is this:  if it is an expanded, uplifted feeling that makes you feel as though you would rather not eat right now, it’s joy rather than pleasure.  Pleasure does not raise the heart rate; in fact it may lower it!  Pleasure causes us to linger, to slow down, to wish to lengthen the moment.  It is also very good for heightening the function of our digestive system (this is why it is healthier to eat food that is delicious).  The result of joy (Fire) is openness; the result of pleasure (Earth) is satisfaction.

Aug 012013
 

Excerpt:“In some sense this is the LAST point on the GB meridian; it is everything we bring from our conceptual pigeon-holing analytical process to the moment of seeing. How is what we see framed by our minds? What is the structure of our witnessing?”

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Jul 312013
 

It takes work to make a flame, to build a fire, to haul the ashes out, to tend a relationship.   Committed relationships are work!   Some relationships are too much work.  There’s a potential burnout factor.  HM 8 addresses the balance of work in committed relationships – both the balance between work and joy within the relationship and the balance of work between the two partners.

Read Heart Mediator 8: The Work of Tending the Fire

 

Both HM 9 ZHONG CHONG and TH1 CHONG GUAN are first contact points.  When we reach out to touch someone, this is where the first contact happens. TH 1 is the Metal Point on TH, while HM 9 is the Wood point on HM.  That makes all the difference.  HM 9 is about moving forward boldly; TH 1 says, “Let’s swiftly assess a few relevant details first.”  When these two fingertip points are working together, we can successfully jump into some really great connection very swiftly.  It’s when these two fingers are not working well together that we can just as quickly end up in social disaster.

Read Heart Mediator 9 and Triple Heater 1

 

Understanding the Triple Heater means coming to a fuller understanding of the healthy nature of the superficial.  People may have a whole lot of depth and integrity, but who the hell are they, and how can you tell? Triple Heater is how we give somebody a sense of what’s in the box by what’s written on the outside of the box. It’s not phony, and it’s not false advertising.  It’s a gesture of warmth on the surface as a place of initial contact.  TH 2 helps us to regulate surface and depth with a comprehensive ability to adapt to hot and cold at the surface, allowing us to attune to our environment and be part of social groups, while remaining stable and rooted in our own core.

Read Triple Heater 1 and 2:  Surface and Depth in Groups

Jul 312013
 

SI 1 is the beginning of the sorting process for the Small Intestine journey.  How do we even begin the sorting process?  The first step is to look around and decide what in the marsh is even worthy of attention, and what in this marsh in worthy of the garbage can. From the very beginning of the small intestine meridian, what can we let go of before we even begin sorting? We are cleansing before attending more closely. How much of this is not even worth thinking about? The first step in achieving clarity is to clean out anything that doesn’t belong here. What are we left with? Now let’s sort it out.

Read Small Intestine 1, Little Marsh:  Where Do I Even Start?

Jul 032013
 

The SP meridian doesn’t end at SP 21.  It ends in a diffuse mist around the Heart. The Heart meridian doesn’t begin at HT 1. It begins in that diffuse mist. Here in the diffuse mist, there is a cross over between thought and insight.  Where does thought end, and heart’s awareness begin?  When am I in my mind, and when am I in my heart?  Not that there’s necessarily a clear line, even though there is a distinction.  The Chinese have one word for both heart and mind: xin.

Read “Thought and Awareness:  SP-21 and HT-1″  (6-page pdf)

Jul 032013
 

For our own health and for the health of the partnership, we need to dispense with the pernicious fiction that within partnership, we are not allowed to have a separate point of view. Hey, we are partners and that’s a commitment, but we still get to see things differently than our partner does, and that is not betrayal of the partnership. For a partnership to be healthy, we’ve got to keep our eye on the Wood that is feeding this Fire. Every team is made up of individuals with their own agendas, and those don’t all disappear when we become a team.

Read “Conflict of Interest in Partnership:  More Wood for the Fire”  (4 pages)

Jun 152013
 

Worksheet

1. Please explain in 2-5 sentences how we can tonify Jing as described in the text.

2. We can create the quality of “interiorization” and tonify Lung yin by cultivating which quality?

3. Where can we find the Yin of the desert?

4. Why can the New Mexico desert landscape help us to feel our Jing?

Jun 152013
 

Exam

1. Where can we find Yin in the desert?

2. Reverence, as a Lung Yin quality, has the characteristic of

3. True or False: Different environments potentiate different aspects of ourselves.

4. Bonding takes place around

5. When we are in touch with the aspect of ourselves that was created old, we cultivate which quality?

6. True or False: Humility in insignificance can be a tremendous relief.

7. The silence in the desert is the only sign that

8. In New England, medically relevant spirituality is about

9. In New Mexico, medically relevant spirituality is about

10. In order to diagnose someone, it is important to

Jun 152013
 

Worksheet

1. The difference between the 5 Element and the 8 Principle traditions is akin to the difference between describing the season and the weather. Which one (5 Elements or 8 Principles) is akin to season?

2. Why is pathology important?

3. Anger to Benevolence is the transformation of virtue for the Wood element. What are the transformations of virtues for the other four elements?

4. Western medicine works according to mechanical causality and chemistry. Chinese herbal medicine works according to resonance. Using the metaphor of the guitar string, how do Chinese herbs cause a particular string to vibrate?

Jun 152013
 

Exam

1. Which are more important, physical or spiritual symptoms?

2. What is the transformation of virtue for Fire?

3. Which type of diagnosis is always changing?

4. Grief to Righteousness is the transformation of virtue for which element?

5. Chinese herbal medicine works through which method?

6. What is the easiest way to determine if a client is in need of the spiritual teachings of a particular herb or herbal formula?

7. Why is pathology important?

8. A formula that address the level of separation of thought and embodiment is probably treating which element?

9. The difference between 5 Element and 8 Principle diagnosis can be thought of as the difference between describing the season and the weather. Which type of diagnosis corresponds to the weather?

10. Which element has to do with the acute awareness of how much is unknown?

Jun 152013
 

Worksheet

1. How can we avoid limiting the possibilities of what can happen in the treatment room?

2. What is more important for the client- being calm and confident in the treatment room, or being grounded with an open heart?

3. What is the heart?

4. What is more important in the treatment room- being smart or being at home in your lower dan tien?

Jun 152013
 

Exam

1. What is the heart?

2. Which of the following allows for more possibility in the treatment room?

3. Which of the following is the most beneficial way to spend your prep time before seeing clients?

4. True or False: When we are with the light, it is not scary or personal to see another’s beauty

5. Not understanding, when done within the luminous space of the heart, is_______

6. When preparing to see clients, it is important to find our true home. Where is our true home?

7. Which of the following is more beneficial for the client?

8. The places where we are broken are___

9. Why is opening the throat important?

10. Do emotions originate in the heart?

11. Clients appreciate it when you are_______

Jun 152013
 

Worksheet

1. Which number is concerned with mapping things out?

2. Which number is concerned with ecology- how individual things relate as a family?

3. Odd and even number have different characteristics. Which types of numbers are concerned with increasing levels of sophistication of unity, rather than increasing levels of distinction?

4. Which number reflects that state of consciousness of unity?

Jun 152013
 

Exam

1. Which number is associated with the wood element?

2. The five space is concerned with which aspect of consciousness?

3. Which number is concerned with naming things?

4. True or False: Chinese numerology is concerned primarily with counting things.

5. Which of the following is NOT one of the six stages?

6. Which number is the space of unruly emotions? This is the place in a novel where the plot thickens.

7. Which of the following is NOT TRUE regarding the eight space?

8. Which of the Six Stages contains the energetic of the first buds of Springtime?

9. Many Chinese couples got married in the year 1999. Why is this?

10. The first awareness that there is a distinction between you and me is characteristic of which space?

Jun 152013
 

Worksheet

1. In Whole Heart Connection, are we engaging primarily with the pathology or the health of people?

2. In Whole Heart Connection, where do we speak from?

3. Is there a difference between the light shinning through my heart and the light shinning through yours? If yes, please explain the difference.

4. How do we earn somebody’s listening?

Jun 152013
 

Exam

1. In Whole Heart Connection, where do we listen from?

2. Which of the following is true regarding Whole Heart Connection?

3. Using the metaphor of the donut, our personalities are the donut. What is the donut hole?

4. True or false: Speaking from the Heart is the same as speaking from strong personal emotion

5. When you speak from the heart to the heart, what happens?

6. Which of the following is a good practice to help you stay in your heart during major life events?

7. When speaking from the heart, which types of things are difficult to say?

8. As a teacher, or as a parent, how can we focus on one person while including the group?

9. Which of the following is a correct description of what the Sufis call templating and the Chinese call wu hxing shi yao?

10. In the audio there is a description of an exercise that includes placing your fist over your heart and slowly unclenching it as your heart itself unclenches. How much time should this take?

Jun 152013
 

Exam

1. Chinese herbs work according to which type of medicine?

2. Which of the following is true regarding the descriptions of herbs in Chinese texts?

3. Chinese herbs work best when______

4. Dosage of herbal formulas tends to be higher in_______

5. In Chinese medicine, which of the following is true of emotion and physiology?

6. When using herbs in a 5 Element context, you must be attuned to_______

7. The direction in which we tend to go off balance; the first domino in our health and our illness; is also known as________

8. Why is it important to recognize the music of the different herbs in our own bodies?

9. Joe Pye using joe pye weed to cure many different conditions is an example of_____

Jun 152013
 

Worksheet

1. Do doses tend to be higher in formulas working in biomedicine or resonance medicine? Why?

2. In the Chinese texts, the indications for herbs are often quite drastic. According to Elizabeth Rochat De La Vallee, who would benefit from herbs with drastic indications such as “vomiting blood?”

3. Three different types of medicine are described in the audio. Name them. Chinese herbs work based on which type of medicine?

4. Joe Pye using joe pye weed to cure many different types of ailments is an example of which type of medicine?

Jun 152013
 

Worksheet

1. You have diagnosed your client with a K/HM block. She feels like she is stuck in a long winter with no communication. Is her block primarily on the HM or K end?

2. Which acupuncture points would be beneficial to add to a K/HM block treatment if the block were primarily on the HM end?

3. Which acupuncture points would be beneficial to add to a K/HM block treatment if the block were primarily on the K end?

4. You have diagnosed your client with a K/HM block. He is closed off and not open to love. Is his block primarily on the K or HM end?

Jun 152013
 

Exam

1. Which type of season does this block feel like?

2. What is the nature of the Kidney’s journey through the middle burner?

3. True or False: the block on the Kidney end is always at K22

4. Which of the following is a good idea to do before doing a treatment for this block, especially if the block is on the HM end?

5. Which of the following is a possible description of someone who is prone to this type of block?

6. If the block is on the Kidney end, which points are a good idea to add to the treatment?

7. True or False: Caution should be used when needling HM1 because it might make your client more prone to falling in love with people who are not safe.

8. A Kidney pulse that feels like a ball point pen most likely indicates:

9. Your client has recently gone through a very difficult time in her life that is now over. Despite being in a relatively good situation now, she is emotionally stuck in the difficulties of the past.

You decided that she has a K/HM block. This block is primarily at which point?

10. Which point can help someone open up to the possibility of love?

Jun 152013
 

Worksheet

1. Where does the Liver meridian end?

2. What is the primary point for close-mindedness?

3. Which point is most associated with issues of not being where your thought you would be by this point in your life? It also has a lot to do with feeling trapped in your circumstances.

4. Which point is most associated with a frustration of wanting to move forward, but an unwillingness to start where you are? It also has a lot to do with self worth issues.

Jun 152013
 

Exam

1. The characters Aldonza from Man of La Mancha and Eeyore exemplify a Liv/Lu block where the block on the Lu end is at which point?

2. Which point is beneficial to add to a Liv/Lu block treatment if your client’s voice is the voice of “everything is crap.”

3. Half or more the liver meridian is located:

4. The relationship between the Hun and the Po is like Jack and the Box. Which is Jack and which is the box?

5. Which of the following is one of the best points for clumsiness because it helps a person to come back into their body?

6. Your client is a 35 year old woman coming to see you for menstrual cramps and depression.

When you ask her about her life, she tells you that she has been working as a waitress in order to support her art. She thought that by this time in her life she would be making a decent living working full time on her art, and not scraping by with tip money. She also assumed she would be married with children, and she is depressed that she is still single. You diagnose her with a Liver/Lung block. The block is primarily on which end?

7. What is the primary point for close-mindedness?

8. Your client is a new mom, who is coming to see you for post-partum depression.

She tells you that she feels like she will be changing diapers and breast-feeding forever, and this makes her feel depressed. You diagnose her with a Liver/Lung block. At which point is the block located primarily?

9. Your next client is full of rage at her plans being thwarted and not being able to move beyond her life circumstances. Which point do you add to your Liver/Lung block treatment so that as the hope rises, it does not lead to an explosion?

10. Your last client of the day is also dealing with anger. She is very sweet and elegant on the surface, but beneath this she has a deep festering rage at what a “shit hole” her life has become.

Which point do you add to your treatment so that there is a place where her issues can be acknowledged very accurately? This point will also help her to “dump the trash.”

Jun 152013
 

Worksheet

1. Which space do the exit entry blocks deal with?

2. Where does the Spleen meridian end and the Heart meridian begin?

3. Please name at least two points that might be useful in your treatment of someone with a deficient Spleen type of Spleen/Heart block (in addition to Sp21 and Ht1).

4. Please name at least two points that might be useful in treating someone with a Spleen/Heart block who has difficulty opening Heart 1 (in addition to Sp21 and H1).

Jun 152013
 

Exam

1. Which of the following is true regarding the space between the ending of one meridian and the beginning of another?

2. Exit and entry points are clustered around:

3. All of the orifices of perception ultimately go to which organ?

4. True or False: Spleen 21 is the end of the Spleen meridian.

5. Which of the following can cause H1 to close?

6. Moxa on Spleen 8 would be a nice addition to the treatment of a Spleen/Heart block if the client had which type of presentation?

7. Which of the following would be an appropriate treatment approach for someone with a closed H1?

8. Where does the Heart meridian begin?

9. What does an excess Spleen type of Spleen/Heart block feel like?

10. Your client’s pulse feels deficient in the Spleen and flickering like a flame in the Heart. What other symptoms is she most likely to present with?

11. True or False: A Spleen/Heart block can develop from “recreational thinking.”

Jun 152013
 

Exam

1. Treating CV8 on a client can help re-connect them with which type of nourishment?

2. Which meridian in the lower jiao travels down, bringing nourishment in from above?

3. Which point is more yin, and has a peaceful quality?

4. Which point is most indicated for a client who is feeling uncomfortable in her body ever since her hysterectomy? This point is about coming to terms with the permanence/impermanence of the body.

5. “Trust is the opposite of worry.” Which point is indicated for replacing worry about one’s health with trust in one’s body and health? This trust is expressed as caring and listening to what the body’s needs are.

6. St 25 is a great point for people who are

7. Which point is good for getting out of a “small town mind” to see greater horizons?

8. Which point is on a level all by itself, and is the ringmaster for the whole lower burner?

9. Which point has to do with really experiencing pleasure, down to the primordial level?

10. Which point has to do with fluid regulation in the trunk?

Jun 152013
 

Worksheet

1. How do the points in the lowest points in the lower burner (CV 2, KI 11 & ST 30) relate to the development of a fetus (both an actual fetus, and that part of ourselves that is fetal in nature)? Why is there no SP point at this level?

2. The transition between SP 12 and SP 13 is the movement between the 1st & 2nd trimesters of pregnancy. At the level of SP 13, the sprit of the unborn child actually moves into the developing body of the fetus.

Why would SP 13 be useful for a woman has not felt at home in her body since having a hysterectomy?

3. Why is ST 27 a good point for someone who is constantly worrying about their health?

4. Why can CV 8 be considered the “ultimate Earth point?”

Jun 112013
 

Worksheet

1. In the Audio, there is a discussion of imbalances at the Wei, Ying and Yuan levels. Which level is addressed by Gui Zhi?

2. Which level is addressed by Bai Shao?

3. Which layer addressed by Long Gu Mu Li?

4. There are six stages of cold induced or love induced disorder. For which stage is Gui Zhi Tang useful?

Jun 112013
 

Exam

1. Which herb(s) can be added to Gui Zhi Tang to bring the formula down into the pelvis and address issues related to sexuality?

2. When someone compulsively shares warmth but is actually cold on the inside, this can be described as

3. Which herb could benefit a person in the situation described in the previous question?

4. Which layer does Bai Shao address?

5. Which of the following is correct about Bai Shao?

6. True or False: Gui Zhi Tang is generally given alone.

7. A compulsive need to share Jing can also be described as

8. Which herb can astringe the blood?

9. Which herb can help give a person his or her own ambiance of warmth, allowing them preemptively to give a little bit of warmth in a safe way?

10. _________ helps us extend our warmth out. ________ helps us not freak out when someone extends warmth.

Jun 112013
 

Worksheet

1. Please name three modern challenges for the SI.

2. The SI is in charge of sorting and determining what is in our conscious awareness. In health, what organ is this done in service to?

3. Please name a formula that is heart enthroning and can be used to correct the relationship between the Stomach and the Heart.

4. There is no signature SI formula, but there are a few formulas that come up a lot when treating the SI. Please name two of these.

Jun 112013
 

Exam

1. In health, the SI sorts data in service of which organ?

2. Which formula is useful for thinking that is too fast and too hot, when there is an incredible level of literal-mindedness that is actually unrealistic?

3. Which herbs are useful for anchoring the SI to the Shao Yin, and can help when it is a water issue that is throwing the SI off balance? These are strong anchoring herbs.

4. Bai Zi Ren and Bai Zi Ren Tang with Chong Pu Acori are useful in which of the following situations?

5. Which herb is useful for a greasy, rich SI that can’t sort because there is not enough bile being produced by the GB? These people may have greasy skin, acne and a feeling of never being happy. They may also have high cholesterol.

6. In the case study of the anxious client with a history of illicit substance abuse, which herb was recommended for heat in the nervous system?

7. One of the case studies that was discussed had to do with male molestation.

In these cases, it is not uncommon for the man being molested to have a physiological pleasure response to a situation that his heart does not embrace. Which type of dysfunction can this lead to?

8. Which herb can be useful for clearing mucoid plaques from the Colon?

It is useful, along with Wu wei zi, for feeling like a pervert. This herb helps to separate out the ways that I am ‘just a little weird’ from the tendencies that have to go because they are not in service to the heart.

9. The SI makes meaning out of experience. What happens when the SI cannot make meaning?

10. When is Mantis Formula useful?

Jun 102013
 

When we talk about the kind of contact we mean when we say Two-ness, we mean the kind of contact between the mother and the unborn child: the sense of sharing one body but two consciousness.  We haven’t yet separated into two separate bodies, and yet there is this sense of togetherness.  It’s not a sophisticated relationship, but it’s the first relationship: the heart aware of another heart beating nearby.

Read “Intro to Fire Points:  Fire as Two”  (2-page pdf)

 

The character for the number seven shows the soil, and something piercing the soil or something jumping out of the envelope.  Boink.  Seven is the thing that jumps out of the cake at you, or jumps out of the closet, or jumps out of…   Seven is the unexpected arising of something lively and significant, and not what you planned.

Read “Intro to Fire Points:  Fire as Seven”  (4-page pdf)

 

The wonderful thing about the Fire element is that we have two wrists and four officials to help us accomplish Fire’s tasks.  The nature of our struggles with feeling the primordial sense of Two coming through the wild Seven-ishness of Fire manifests differently depending on whether we are talking about the yang Left wrist Fire (Heart and Small Intestine) or the yin Right wrist Fire (Heart Mediator and Triple Heater).

Read “Intro to Fire Points:  Fire Pulse Positions”  (2-page pdf)

 

The first Fire Official we will discuss is Xin, which is Heart itself when felt and known as the Radiant Void.   The next Official to look at is Xin Zhu.  Elizabeth Rochat De La Vallee translates this Heart Master.  Xin Zhu pictures a Heart and a lantern with light coming out of it.  There is the Heart simply as a Radiant Void (Xin), and then there is Xin Zhu, which is the Heart spreading its light outward into the world.

Read “Intro to Fire Points:  Fire Officials –   Xin and Xin Zhu”  (3-page pdf)

 

The Xin Bao Luo network of enveloping connections has everything to do with how you receive it when someone comes up to you and sends love and warmth your way. Can you take it in?

Read “Intro to Fire Points:  Fire Officials – Xin Bao Luo”  (4-page pdf)

 

The Tan Zhong is like several other Fire aspects all put together, making a whole that is greater than the sum of its parts.  The function of Tan Zhong brings responsiveness and responsibility, and is like the conductor of the orchestra of my awareness.  In a sense, it is the true seat of propriety, is in charge of the setting of the pace and the rhythm for the entire body, with the Lung and the Heart working together.

Read “Intro to Fire Points:  Tan Zhong”  (2-page pdf)

 

Joy is the greatest threat to propriety, and like all the other pathological emotions, it’s also the entryway to propriety, because it’s in these moments of joy that we open to profound bonding.   The virtue is to be able to take these incredible openings and hold them as part of the greater web of all connection in our life. Holding the web, being the web, bringing all new openings into that web, creates a deeper and more inclusive ‘we.’

Read “Intro to Fire Points:  Joy (Xi) to Propriety (Li)”  (9-page pdf)

 

All four of the Fire meridians traverse the length of our arms.  What is an arm?  What is the difference between arms and legs?  There is a lot of information about the nature of Fire right there in that one simple question.

Read “Intro to Fire Points:  Fire Creates Arms!”  (5-page pdf)

 

Jun 082013
 

Worksheet

1. For each point, please answer the following questions:




Can you think of a client for whom this would be an important point, or a moment in your life when this point would have been helpful? What might have been the result, if you did this point at that time?




1. Heart 6, Yinhsi:

2. Kidney 5- Shuichuan:

3. Liver 6 Chungtu:

4. Spleen 8 Tichi:

5. Stomach 34 Liangchiu:

6. Gall Bladder 36 Waichiu:

7. Urinary Bladder 63 Chinmen:

8. Heart Mediator 4 Hsimen:

9. Triple Energizer Huitsung:

10. Small Intestine 6, Yanglao:

11. Lung 6 Kungtsui:

12. Colon 7 Wenliu:

Jun 082013
 

Exam

1. Xi Cleft points on Yin Meridians are generally used for:

2. The Xi Cleft point of the Heart, Heart 6 Yinhsi has the effect of

3. The Xi Cleft point of which Meridian is described as sort of like train station with a lot of junctions of coming and going, and is used for a person who is planning things that don't need to be planned?

4. SI 6 Yanglao, nourishing the old, is

5. The Xi Cleft point of which Meridian is excellent for treating for a shy person who needs to do door to door petitioning i.e. they need to use not a personal voice but the ancestral voice?

6. The Xi Cleft point of which Meridian is excellent for treating for the chronically insensitive, e.g. the people whose wei qi looks like it was made with a 3 inch wide graffiti marker, a.k.a. the lead pipe people?

7. Colon 7 Warm Current is best described as

8. The Xi Cleft point of which meridian is useful for treating deep rages, deep terror, sexual overwhelm, the emotions that are strong emotion driven endocrine events

9. The Xi Cleft of which Meridian is used for giving a 'lift' up from couch potato to farmer. It is also excellent to prevent miscarriage.

10. The Xi clefts are great for

11. True or False: Stomach 34 is helpful when a person needs the fortitude to decide to hurl this, shit that, and go on to decide what's for lunch.

12. True or False: Bladder 63 Golden Gate is helpful for pressing the reset button on the whole circulatory system.

13. True or False: Heart 6 is excellent to get the nervous system to balance between alertness and wisdom.

14. True or False: Heart Mediator 4 Xi Gate is a very good point for congealed blood of the heart mediator, which is an entrenched pattern of 'can't trust anyone.'

15. True or False: Lung 6 is about the communication between the inside and the outside. It's very good for people who feel like lace or a screen door.

Jun 082013
 

Worksheet

1. For each point, please answer the following question:



Can you think of a client with whom this would be an important point, or a moment in your life when this point would have been helpful? What might have been the result, if you did this point at that time?




1. Heart 8:

2. Kidney 10:

3. Liver 1:

4. Gall Bladder 41:

5. Spleen 3:

6. Stomach 36:

7. Urinary Bladder 66:

8. Heart Mediator 8:

9. Triple Energizer 6:

10. Small Intestine 5:

11. Lung 8:

12. Colon 1:

Jun 062013
 

Worksheet

1. Use this scenario for the first four questions: Four Water CF’s come to you for herbs to help them with FEAR.

Question 1: The first client says, “I’m afraid of any woman who starts to get serious about me. I love women, I love sex, but I’m terrified of love. As soon as I start to feel like it’s more than just “a beautiful woman” that I’m sleeping with, I run—I end it right away.” He has low back pain and you can’t figure out if it’s more tight or more weak, and the same could be said for his pulses; his groan is obvious but his tongue doesn’t show clearly whether it’s KI yin or yang deficiency. You think about what formula:

2. The second client says,

“My biggest fear in life is not finding a bathroom in time. I have a very weak bladder, and it’s a cause of constant anxiety because every time I really start laughing and having fun, that’s when it’s most likely to go.” She goes on to describe her idea of a good time, which has you involuntarily raising an eyebrow, in part because of her extreme candor. Then she gets confused and says, “I’m not sure if that’s what I really want to be talking about. Let’s focus on the urinary symptoms, OK?” Her pulse is weak and her tongue is fairly normal; you think about what formula?

3. The third client says,

“In the face of any danger from without, I am fearless—but the ineluctable tracks of the endless march of time as they form as wrinkles on my face and progressively graying hair leaves me in inward terror of a dark and uncertain future. The signs of inevitable decline are everywhere—my teeth are loosening, my doctor says I have incipient osteoporosis, and my back aches all the time. I feel that time is running out, and yet I haven’t even figured out what I’m living for.” You think of what formula:

4. The fourth client says,

“I feel like I am doomed. Life just seems so dark to me, but I am afraid to move through it and make something better.” He feels cold all the time, and has a cold and weak low back and knees. He also admits to having a low libido and problems with impotence. His pulse is deep and weak, and his tongue is pale and swollen with a thin white coat. You prescribe:

5. QUESTIONS 5 THRU 9 REFER TO THE FOLLOWING LIST OF HERBS:

Tu Si Zi cuscuta
Sang Piao Xiao mantis
Fu Zi aconite
Shi Di Huang rehmannia
Shan Han Yao dioscorea
Niu Xi achyranthus

5. Which of these herbs comes to mind for a client with lower back pain that feels cold to the touch, and a deep sense of immobile, frozen dread that rules his life?

6. Which of these herbs comes to mind for a client with lower back pain and a dribbling bladder, and a dribbling budget, and loves to dribble gossipy secrets everywhere she goes?

7. Which of these herbs comes to mind for a client with lower back pain that feels warm to the touch,

and an unrooted restlessness that keeps him up late every night avoiding the moments of darkness and silence and stillness that he’d have to face if he went to bed before the point of total exhaustion?

8. Which of these herbs comes to mind for a client with lower back pain and concerns about fertility? She is 43 years old and wants to have a child.

9. Which of these herbs comes to mind for a client with lower back pain and a history of lower back injury? He also injured his knee a couple of months ago and it still hurts.

10. You’ve been treating a middle-aged male Water CF for a few months, and he is clearly making progress with acupuncture.

You decide to give him a constitutional formula to help space out treatments more quickly because now that he is no longer a workaholic and you’ve helped him to be able to rest and relax and take some down-time, he no longer has very much income. His tongue is reddish, and peeled. His pulse is tight especially in the lower burner. His main concern continues to be “being run by fear—I let it keep me on the run when I should be resting.” You give him:

11. QUESTIONS 11 THROUGH 14 REFER TO THE FOLLOWING FORMULAS:

JIN GUI SHEN QI WAN
ER XIAN TANG
ER ZHI WAN

Question 11: Which formula would be best for a cold dark sense of doom and a weak flaccid backache with fatigue?

12. Which formula would be best for a woman who runs cold except when she is experiencing a hot flash?

13. Which formula would be best for a recovering heroin addict who is liver and kidney yin deficient?

14. Select all of the herbs on the following list that tonify yin:

SHAN ZHU YU cornus
SHAN YAO dioscorea
ZE XIE alisma
HE SHOU WU polygonum
TU SI ZI cuscuta
SANG PIAO XIAO mantis
FU ZI aconite
ROU GUI cinnamon bark
GUI BAN tortoise shell
BU GU ZI psoralea

Jun 062013
 

Worksheet

1. Use this scenario for the first five questions: Five Metal CF’s come to you for herb consults. When asked their main concern, each strikes a pose like Greta Garbo and says, “I vant to be alone.”

Question 1: The first client wants to be alone because if anyone around her is sick, she’s guaranteed to catch it. She gets every cold and flu that goes around. She also is very sensitive in point location class, and can’t be in elevators where unhappy people are riding with her or she feels awful for the rest of the day. She has a shiny qi-deficient pallor and her pulse is yielding especially on the right wrist. Her tongue is pale and scalloped. You prescribe:

2. The second client wants to be alone because he spends his whole day being incredibly charming to rich people buying yachts.

He tries so hard to make sales by warming up his clients and helping them feel appreciative of the value of the yachts for sale, and by the end of the day he just feels raw and thin-skinned and wants communion only with Love and Beauty, not people. Yet at the same time he feels lonely because he hasn’t really made contact with anyone all day. He has an irregular pulse, and irregular breathing as he climbs the stairs. He has constipation that is very dry, and he blushes easily when he mentions it. His tongue is reddish and peeled especially in the front, and has scallops. His pulse is flat and yielding especially in the upper burner. You prescribe:

3. Another client wants to be alone because he feels disgusting even to himself, and imagines that other people will revile him as well. His house is a total mess, and he says he’s an even worse slob on a moral and spiritual level.

He does in fact look sort of grubby, but nice anyway—maybe just a haircut, shower and change of clothes would make all the difference. He has sticky skin, sticky diarrhea, a sticky cough, and is very hard to get rid of at the end of his appointment time. His pulse is yielding and slippery; his tongue has a gooey white coat and scallops. He tells you that JR has diagnosed him as Metal with double Earth within. That’s the last straw; you prescribe:

4. The next client wants to be alone because she’s exhausted. Even things that used to seem worthwhile now seem like just too much energy. She says sometimes she feels too tired to breathe.

She’s been working at a job that she finds boring, living a life she finds boring, and yet it’s been taking so much out of her that she can’t even imagine what she’d rather do. She has constipation that seems more slow than dry and hard, little appetite, and gets a kind of empty-headed type of headache at the end of really long days. Her pulse is yielding and her tongue is scalloped. You prescribe:

5. The next client wants to be alone because every interaction seems to turn into a fight, or at least a struggle. Everything is a pain in the neck, and in fact his shoulders and neck are extremely tight.

He has intermittent asthma which manifests as a tightness in the whole ribcage which comes on with stress—mostly confrontations and oppositions, of which there seem to be so many. He also has insomnia, and when you later see him lying on the tx table you understand why, because he can’t let his guard down enough to relax. His pulse is tense and a bit flat in the Metal position. His tongue is bluish. You prescribe:

6. Questions 6 through 8 refer to the following list of formulas:

(JIA WEI) SHENG MAI SAN Generate the Pulse
(JIA WEI) LIU JUN ZI TANG Six Gentlemen
(JIA WEI) BU ZHONG YI QI TANG Tonify the Middle and Augment the Qi
YU PING FENG SAN Jade Windscreen

6. Which formula is best for “life is boring and meaningless” type grief?

7. Which formula is best for dry cough and dry skin?

8. Which formula is best for gooey cough and sticky skin?

9. Questions 9 through 15 refer to the following list of herbs:

Tian Men Dong asparagus root
Mai Men Dong ophiopogon
Wu Wei Zi schizandra
Jie Geng platycodon
Ren Shen ginseng
Huang Qi astragalus
Bai Zhu atractylodes
Ban Xia pinellia

9. Which of these herbs moisten Metal?

10. Which of these herbs clear excess moisture from Metal?

11. Which herb is best for clearing chunky phlegm?

12. Which herb is best for clearing Lung phlegm by lightly circulating the qi?

13. Which herb is best for clearing Lung phlegm by grasping the qi into the jin/ye?

14. Which connects the Lung to the KI with a deep quiet inhale?

15. Which connects the LU to the HT with a bow of acceptance?

Jun 062013
 

Worksheet

1. Questions 1 through 11 apply to the following list of formulas:



ER CHEN TANG Two-Cured Soup
BU ZHONG YI QI TANG Tonify the Middle and Benefit the Qi
XIANG SHA LIU JUN ZI TANG Saussurea Amomum 6 Gents
LIU JUN ZI TANG 6 Gents
BAN XIA HOU PO TANG Pinellia and Magnolia
LI ZHONG WAN Regulate the Middle
YIN ZHONG TANG Receptive Middle

Question 1: Which is best for someone with a slippery yet strong pulse?

2. Which is best for someone with a slippery yet tense pulse?

3. Which is best for someone with a tight pulse?

4. Which is best for someone with cramping diarrhea?

5. Which is best for someone who is flat and exhausted?

6. Which is best for someone with thick phlegm?

7. Which is best for someone who is weak and stuck with lots of excuses?

8. Which is most moistening?

9. Which is most warming?

10. Which is most uplifting?

11. Which two formulas move Qi the most?

12. Questions 12 through 15 apply to the following list of herbs:



Ren Shen ginseng
Bai Zhu atractylodes
Gan Cao licorice
Huang Qi astragalus
Chen Pi tang peel
Ban Xia pinellia
Fu Ling poria
Shan Yao diascorea
Mu Xiang saussurea
Shen Qu massa fermenta
Shan Zha craetagus

12. Which is the main herb for phlegm?

13. Which is the main herb for food stagnation of greasy food?

14. Which is the main herb for Spleen Yin?

15. Which is the main herb for ANTI-GRAVITY POWER!?

Jun 062013
 

Worksheet

1. Use this scenario to answer the first five questions: Five Fire CF’s come to you saying they want a formula to treat nervousness and insomnia.

Question 1: The first nervous insomniac Fire CF client is eating rice cakes during the visit because she says she’s hypoglycemic and only eating calms her down. Her insomnia is worst during and after her period. She says she’s scatterbrained and worries a lot, and during times of high stress gets crampy diarrhea. Her pulse is thin on the left wrist, yielding and a bit slippery on the right. Her tongue is pale especially at the tip and has scallops. You prescribe:

2. The second nervous insomniac Fire CF client has a fluttery demeanor and blushes as she tells you that her insomnia is because she lies awake thinking about what she might say to a guy she’s attracted to but has been too shy to speak to yet.

Her pulse is thin, her tongue is pale. You prescribe:

3. The next nervous insomniac Fire CF client is a tall pale man with a malar flush and a book of Romantic poetry (Keats, Shelley, Bryon) in his hand.

He says he is restless and anxious all the time and part of his insomnia is just being unable to stop moving around the house and go to bed. He has palpitations as he lies awake and is often very thirsty in the night. He has night sweats fairly often and during times of stress gets tight low back pain. His pulse is tight, his tongue is peeled and red with a heart crack. You prescribe:

4. The next client has had insomnia and a nerve-wracked fear of sudden death ever since September 11th. He has a dry mouth, dry skin, and an irregular pulse. The pulse is empty in the upper chou.

His tongue is fairly normal but a HT crack is developing at the tip. You prescribe:

5. The next client has insomnia and a nervous giggle. He says he has had insomnia and nervousness ever since witnessing a bank robbery in which an innocent bystander got shot.

This happened three years ago and ever since, he jumps and get confused and disoriented whenever he hears loud sounds. His tongue has a heart crack and is scalloped especially near the front. His pulse is absent in the HT position and a little slippery in SI and ST/SP. You prescribe:

6. QUESTIONS 6 THRU 17 REFER TO THE FOLLOWING LIST OF HERBS:

dan shen salvia
huang qi astragalus
gui zhi cinnamon twig
yuan zhi polygala
suan zao ren ziziphus
long gu dragon bones

6. Which of these herbs comes to mind for a client with palpitations and exhaustion, whose heart skips a lot of beats on exertion, and generally has very little spunk?

7. How would you describe in 8 Principle zang/fu terms what this herb is potentiating (i.e. “doing”) in the client’s heart?

8. Which of these herbs comes to mind for a client with palpitations and poor memory, and sleep that is very shallow? Incidentally, she also has very scant menses.

9. How would you describe in 8 Principle zang/fu terms what this herb is potentiating (i.e. “doing”) in the client’s heart?

10. Which of these herbs comes to mind for a client with palpitations and a tendency to get startled easily, fly off the handle, and inability to sit still or concentrate for long?

11. How would you describe in 8 Principle zang/fu terms what this herb is potentiating (i.e. “doing”) in the client’s heart?

12. Which of these herbs comes to mind for a client with palpitations and stabbing pain in the heart ever since his third wife left him?

13. How would you describe in 8 Principle zang/fu terms what this herb is potentiating (i.e. “doing”) in the client’s heart?

14. Which of these herbs comes to mind for a client with palpitations and muddled confusion and a tendency to make embarrassing Freudian slips?

15. How would you describe in 8 Principle zang/fu terms what this herb is potentiating (i.e. “doing”) in the client’s heart?

16. Which of these herbs comes to mind for a client with palpitations and shyness with sensitivity to drafts and cold shoulders?

17. How would you describe in 8 Principle zang/fu terms what this herb is potentiating (i.e. “doing”) in the client’s heart?

18. A young man walks into your office for his herb consult, immediately begins blushing when you shake his hand (which suddenly breaks into a cold sweat), and stutters out his name nervously, glancing down at the floor.

When you begin the intake by asking him what it is that is concerning him, he says, “I fall in love with all of my practitioners. I come down with a crush almost instantly, and then I get really really shy and say all kinds of things I don’t really mean, because I love them and I want them to love me, and I end up feeling foolish and sad.” You look at his tongue; it is pale and wet. He says he has no other physical symptoms or concerns. You think of what formula:

19. Name the ingredients in this formula.

20. Which are the two most important ingredients?

21. Now he says, “Oh I guess I’ll tell you more—I have other symptoms, too. I get very carried away by my crushes, and try to get them to go to bed with me, and if they don’t, I have lots and lots of sexual dreams about them anyway. I have some low

back pain that develops if anyone actually does make love with me, and I sweat a LOT.”

You decide to add what two substances to form another common formula?

Jun 062013
 

Worksheet

1. For the first 5 questions, use this scenario: Five clients come in; all of them are angry Wood CFs, and want help with transforming their anger into Benevolence.

Question 1: The first is a pale woman with a shy demeanor. She is uncomfortably fidgeting in her chair, as though she doesn’t have aright to take up the whole seat. She says she’s angry at all the injustice in the world, particularly to welfare mothers, children, owls, whales, the rainforest… She feels close identification with all beings weak, small, unable to assert themselves and injured as a result. She has scant menses, soft weak nails, lusterless hair, a pale tongue and thin pulse. You are reminded of what very basic formula? 1 sentence, 8 minutes.

2. Next comes an angry man with a hurried, pressured demeanor.

He wants you to fix his migraine headaches pronto, and the way he pressures you leaves you feeling like he IS a headache. He thinks his headaches are caused by all the people who don’t obey laws, and just want things their own way. He is very self-righteously angry about this, and by agreeing you slip into a deeper rapport in which he confesses to feelings of powerlessness underneath his pressured exterior, and a literal physical impotence much of the time. He has high blood pressure and a history of stroke in his family. He has lower back pain and a very stiff spine and neck. You think about what formula? 1 sentence, 8 minutes.

3. Another client comes in and says “My whole life feels like a parking space that’s too tight. I’m constantly frustrated to the point where I can hardly relax enough to take a deep breath.” She has a tense pulse, and a bluish tongue.

You think about what formula? 1 sentence, 9 minutes.

4. A client comes in and says “I’m mad because other people take advantage of my generosity, and don’t even know that they’re stepping all over me. I never realize until it’s too late that I should have been less sympathetic and said NO sooner.

By then my guts are all knotted up.” His pulse is tense on the left, slippery on the right. The tongue is bluish. You think of what formula? 1 sentence, 8 minutes.

5. A loud, belligerent client comes roaring in, rips the door off and howls, “What kind of flimsy door is that! I am so mad at the way everything is built so shoddy and breaks so easily! Arrgh!”

She has bloodshot eyes, and you can SEE her Wood pulsepounding and rolling visibly on her wrist. Before asking her to pay for fixing the door, you consider administering what formula? 1 sentence, 9 minutes.

Jun 062013
 

Exam

1. Your client is a woman who had a hysterectomy seven months ago, and has been allergic to every form of hormone replacement that she has tried.

She tells you that her life is a nightmare due to feeling hot and then cold and then hot and then cold; she can hardly stand it. Her tongue is pale; her pulse is deep. You think of what formula:

2. She tells you her sex drive is basically nil. You suspect that what herb already in the formula might help a lot?

3. Three weeks later she comes back saying that her hot flashes are much better and yet she is generally warmer. Her libido is starting to pick up a bit.

She says she also feels a greater sense of purpose in life, an inner strength that she never knew she had before. She is positive that it is from the herbs, and now that she knows that herbs can help her spirit, she wants further help. She is in crisis because her new inner strength has come, she fears, too late in life; she says she is no longer young, and she feels she is past her prime. She is filled with a desire to make the rest of her life worth living, and wants you to help her get in touch with (and increase if you can) her inner vital resources. Name a formula which could address these issues:

4. Your next client’s main issue is depression. He has a dark face, and darkness seems to gather around him; his voice is a deep groan as he tells you that he feels like his life is disappearing into darkness, and that he can’t even bring himself to care.

He has no will to go on, and says the only reason he’s not considering suicide is that the idea of so much nothingness scares him even more than life. He says he wishes he had the courage to face death, but he doesn’t. He is cold, his tongue is pale and wet, his pulse is deep. Which formula do you prescribe?

5. Your third new client has a tight pulse and a peeled red tongue, especially along the sides.

He comes in looking like a model from GQ, and although he doesn’t interrupt you when you talk, he responds to questions with NO SPACE between the end of your sentence and the beginning of his own; and then his words rush out like speeding bullets, half weep, half shout. His main issue is a feeling of tightness in his chest, as though the membranes are stretched and dry and tight, along with a pressured feeling in his lower ribcage. It’s worse when he’s been working long hours, drinking coffee and not spending time with his wife, who makes him slow down. It becomes clear that the real reason he’s here is because of his workaholism, which is a source of grief to him only because his wife complains that she misses him, and he misses her too, but he can’t stop. Also he drives very very fast, which terrifies his wife, but the feeling of “getting ahead” is the only thing that frees the tight feeling in his chest. You ask him if his father was the same way. He fights to keep the tears from spilling out of his eyes as he talks about his father never being home, and when he was, never even seeming to SEE him. He became an overachiever, driven, for his father’s praise, which never came. You ask, “So if your father were to say to you, Son, I am proud of you-- you’d stop driving so fast?” He gets up and bolts out of the room as the tears come, and you think of what formula:

6. The fourth client of the day says, “My back hurts whenever I bounce a check.

Ha ha ha, I’m joking; I’m nervous to be here—actually I don’t know what I’m really here for but I think I need some help. Could I use your bathroom? Gotta pee AGAIN; mostly it happens when I’m nervous.” He says that he has a poor memory and tends to be impulsive. Eventually he admits he’s really here because of his problem with premature ejaculation, and with severe backaches which go on for a few days after every time he has sex. His pulse is a bit deep, a bit weak, maybe a bit tight. His tongue is scalloped and pale, but getting a bit peeled. You think of what formula:

7. The formula from question 10 is contraindicated in which situation?

8. Which formula is indicated for extreme sexual anxiety and a fear of intimacy that resembles a fear of death?

9. You next client says, “My back only aches when I pull an all-nighter and then try to bend over to untie my shoes.

It’s like my back muscles shrink up, they get so tight. Sometimes it feels like something in there is going to snap. It scares me.” She has a malar flush. She says all the creme rinse in the world doesn’t stop her hair from being mostly dry split ends. Her pulse is tight; her tongue is peeled and red. You think of:

10. You are treating an aggressive business man for high blood pressure and migraines. After you have been seeing him for a few weeks, he admits to having trouble with impotence. Which formula do you give him?

11. Your next client is a quiet woman who says, “I’m tired, and my back is tired. Cold weather makes me feel like staying in bed, and makes my back just feel like it’s going to give out.

I’d stay in bed forever except that I have to pee so much, large quantities. I have very little willpower; I tend to get overwhelmed. For instance I ought to go to a dentist; my teeth are soft and breaking. But I don’t have the courage to go.” Her pulse is deep; her tongue is pale bluish, swollen and wet. You think of:

12. Your client from question 15 was so pleased with her treatment that she gave some of her formula to her brother, who also has back pain. Unfortunately, this formula made his back pain worse!

You recommend that the brother schedule an appointment with you, and he comes in the following day. He tells you that in addition to his back getting worse, he has also been feeling more agitated and hot, especially in the afternoon. After you talk about his back for little while, he asks if there is anything you can do for his genital herpes. He is not sure exactly when he contracted the herpes, but he is not shy in telling you about the various possibilities. Which formula do you prescribe (along with recommending a full STD screening test at the clinic down the road)?

13. Which herb is contraindicated for someone who has dampness and difficulty with digestion?

14. Which herb is indicated to help with comfortable inward vision, and tonifies Jing, Blood, Kidney Yin and Liver Yin?

15. Your patient is a 55 year old woman who is coming to see you because she feels depressed. She has spent her adult life taking care of three children. Now that her children are grown and have moved away, she feels like her life is empty.

She feels like she wasted her life because she put her own passions on the back burner in order to raise her family, and now she feels like it is too late. Which formula do you give her to aid in moving into her next phase of life?

16. You next client is coming to see you for insomnia. She feels anxious all the time, especially when resting. Lying in bed at night she feels palpitations and has difficulty settling into sleep. She also complains of dry skin and a constant thirst.

Which formula do your recommend?

17. Which herb is an astringent that is indicated for cases of sexual confusion, where what is needed is to connect the heart and the kidney?

18. Which of the following herbs are yin tonics? Select all that apply.

19. Which of the following herbs are yang tonics? Select all that apply.

20. Which of the following are jing tonics? Please select all that apply.

21. Which herb is indicated to nourish the root of fire and can be helpful with cold infertility and menstrual cramps that are relieved by warmth?

22. Which herb drains damp?

23. Which herb is the most warming?

24. True or False: Du zhong eucommia is contraindicated in pregnancy because it may cause miscarriage.

25. Which herb is a small back seed that helps you realize that you have everything you need inside of you? It also helps strengthen the pelvic floor.

26. Which herb is best to tonify both Spleen and kidney Yang?

27. Which is better for urinary incontinence?

28. See text below

Your last client of the week comes in to see you for back pain. He says, “Vanity, vanity, all is vanity and a chase after the wind.” You ask him how this relates to his back ache. He says, “I’ve been chasing after the wind; I’m old before my time, and all because I lived as though there were no tomorrow. Now I walk like an old man with a bent back and sore knees, gray-haired and wrinkled, teeth falling out, and I’m only 37. Can you turn back the sands of time? Only that could cure my backache.” His pulse is deeper than deep and tighter than tight. You think of:

29. Which herb in the formula from question 28 goes most directly to strengthen the back?

30. Which is the most yang tonic herb in formula from question 28?

Jun 062013
 

Exam

1. The herbalist for whom you fill prescriptions says, “Gotta whole bunch of Metal CF’s coming in today; you figure out which formula goes to which client.” (For questions 1-9)

Which of these formulas is best for the client who is “to tired to be inspired” and has a yielding pulse and shallow, weak breathing?

2. Which of these formulas is best for the client who has had a sudden shocking loss?

3. Which of these formulas is best for the client who is angry instead of grieving?

4. Which of these formulas is best for the client who catches lots of colds?

5. Which of these formulas is best for the client who is like a GUI ZHI TANG Cinnamon Twig Soup person, but has heat in the blood, and yin deficient Metal?

6. Which two formulas are most known for treating irregular pulse? (select two below)

7. Which of these formulas is best for the client who has thick sticky clear (or white) phlegm in their lungs?

8. Which of these formulas is best for the client who feels dry and tightly constrained in their chest?

9. Which of these formulas is best for the client who gets nosebleeds and palpitations after pulling an all-nighter?

10. Which of these singles is best for wet lungs constrained by exterior cold AND stagnant Gall Bladder qi?

11. Which of the following singles is best for descending the lung qi?

12. Which of the following singles is best for coughing?

13. Which of the following singles is best for constipation from excess heat and dampness?

14. Which of the following singles is best for yin deficient constipation?

15. A client comes in 15 minutes late because during her last errand, someone had parked their car so close to hers that it took her a long time to work her car out of the spot without denting the other person’s car.

In the process, her frustration mounted and mounted until her lungs closed up, and now she’s wheezing from chest constriction. She says this sort of thing is basically the story of her whole life. She also complains of cold hands and feet, dry mouth, and a significantly stiff neck and shoulders. It’s hard for her to get to sleep without a neck rub, which doesn’t happen often so difficulty falling asleep is a serious issue. She also wakes at 3 a.m. feeling a combination of grief and self-judgement over the many mistakes she feels she’s made in her life. Her tongue is bluish and a bit red and peeled in the front; her pulse is tight in the upper burner and tense/constrained in the middle burner. You give her:

16. She says her last herbalist gave her REN SHEN GE JIE SAN Ginseng and Gecko for her breathing problems, and it didn’t work; in fact she felt worse.

You know that this is because REN SHEN GE JIE SAN Ginseng and Gecko clears HOT PHLEGM, and tonifies both Metal and WATER, which is not right for this womon.

17. Which one of these herbs astringes Metal?

18. Which one of these herbs circulates Metal?

19. Which of these herbs moisten Metal (select all that apply)?

20. Which herb is best for clearing out cold chunky phlegm in the Lung?

21. Which herb connects LU yang and KI yang, and strengthens the power to grasp the breath?

22. Which herb is best for fragile bleeding from low self-worth (blood def Metal)?

23. Which herb is a gentle laxative, and helps a person accept mistakes and let them go?

24. Which herb decreases unhealthy, forlorn longing and desire?

25. Which herb opens shut-down phlegmatic Metal (and constrained Wood)?

26. A person needing REN SHEN GE JIE SAN Ginseng and Gecko would be likely to have (select all that apply):

27. REN SHEN GE JIE SAN Ginseng and Gecko is an unusual formula because it BOTH (select all that apply):

28. YU PING FENG SAN Jade Windscreen is good for someone who has (select all that apply):

29. ZHEN QING MIAN AN TANG Clear Sleep Peaceful Pillow might be good for someone who (select all that apply):

30. Comparing YU PING FENG SAN Jade Windscreen to GUI ZHI TANG CinnamonTwig Soup, which is better for sensitivity to criticism?

Jun 062013
 

Exam

1. The following scenario applies to Questions 1-11:

You are apprenticed to an herbalist who has you make formulas for her. Putting together the formula is the easy part; the challenge is that she never tells you who it is for. She just says it's for one of the people she'll be treating today. It's up to you to figure it out. Luckily, everyone who comes in tends to tell you their whole life story as they sit in the waiting room, so you have a good chance of figuring it out.

You have two bags of herbs to give out this morning. One is the formula Gui Pi Tang Restore Spleen. The other is Tian Wang Bu Xin Tang Heavenly Emperor Special Pill to Nourish the Heart. A client walks in and says, "I've come to pick up my insomnia formula." You are considering which bag to hand to her when another woman walks in and says the exact same thing. You are going to have to figure out which is which. Both appear to be fire constitutions.

Question 1: As a way of buying time, you introduce yourself and shake hands with both of them. You notice that one has a much warmer, dryer hand than the other; her palm especially seems to be giving off heat. You realize that this is a clue that points to which formula:

2. You say, "Both formulas cost $18 for a month\'s supply."

They both look in their bags and one says, "Oh I ran out of the house so fast I forgot my checkbook! O fathomless depths of fear! Deep terrors disturb the very root of my soul, and also my lower back. Alas, what will become of me when the dark night falls! Do you take credit cards?” You consider this a more likely clue to which formula:

3. The other woman is muttering worriedly and churning the contents of her bag without finding payment, but apparently finding a lot of other interesting things she didn't know she had.

She pulls out a St. Patrick's Day charm bracelet, a very expensive chocolate bar, an unopened box of contraceptives and a police whistle, and asks you if she can barter. Before you can respond she begins opening and eating the chocolate bar, saying she needs to raise her blood sugar level to calm her nerves. You consider all of this to be a clue pointing more to which formula:

4. You go down the hall to get the formulas. You overhear one say to the other, "Do you know where I can get a drink of water around here? I'm always so thirsty." Which formula does this indicate?

5. You overhear one saying to the other, "Oh not another nosebleed!

Do you have any tissues or anything?" The other one says "Gee, all I have is these tampons; I\'ve been having a lot of break-though bleeding. Do you want to try using a couple of them?"

You hurry back into the room with a bunch of paper towels and both formulas. To the woman with the nosebleed you give which formula:

6. To the woman with the break-through bleeding you give which formula?

7. Which one do you predict has a redder tongue?

8. Which one has a tight pulse?

9. Which one is more likely to have loose bowels?

10. Please select the herbs which are in Tian Wang Bu Xin Tang Heavenly Emperor Special Pill to Nourish the Heart, but NOT in Gui Pi Tang Restore Spleen:

11. Please select the herbs which are in Gui Pi Tang Restore Spleen, but NOT in Tian Wang Bu Xin Tang Heavenly Emperor Special Pill to Nourish the Heart:

12. The following scenario applies to Questions 12-19:

Now the acupuncturist you work for has you make up 3 more formulas: Sheng Mai San Generate the Pulse, Dao Chi San Guide Out The Red, and Gan Mai Da Zao Tang Licorice Wheat and Jujube. She says they’ll all be here at 2:00 sharp to pick them up. Indeed, precisely at 2:00 you hear a loud CRASH in the parking lot. you run out (herb bags in hand) to see that the three clients have had an auto collision. they are all out of their cars. One is sobbing hysterically, one is cursing bitterly, and one has fainted on the pavement.

12:To the one who has fainted you give which formula:

13. To the one who is cursing you give which formula:

14. On the one who is sobbing hysterically you give which formula:

15. The one who is unconscious has an open mouth, so you can clearly see his tongue. Which of the following is an accurate description of this client’s tongue?

16. You decide you must take everyone’s pulse to confirm your diagnosis.

You take the unconscious man’s pulse, to be sure he is not dead. He’s not. You take the sobbing man’s pulse, and your touch calms him. You take the cursing man’s pulse and he says “Get the #@$%*&^^& off my arm!” This allows you to glimpse his tongue clearly; which of the following is an accurate description of this client’s tongue?

17. Which of the three has the most irregular pulse?

18. Which of the three has the most shallow breathing?

19. Which has the most tight and rapid pulse?

20. The following scenario applies to Questions 20-27:

The acupuncturist walks out to the parking lot, tonifies HT-7 on all 3 of them, and they all say, “Thanks, see you later.” She hands you 3 more prescriptions to fill. You get to work on Gui Zi Tang Cinnamon Twig Soup, Gui Zhi Fu Ling Tang Cinnamon Poria Pill, and Yang Xin Tang Astragalus and Zizipus Soup. She says, “These people are already in the waiting room; make it snappy, OK?” You get to work.

Question 20: Of these clients, which is likely to be most disturbed by sitting under an air conditioning vent?

21. Which is most likely to be stuttering?

22. Which will have the most purple tongue?

23. Which will have the most scalloped tongue?

24. Which is most likely to be deeply distrustful?

25. Which is most likely to have palpitations?

26. Which is most likely to have tumor?

27. Which is most likely to be fatigued?

28. Which one of the following herbs supports heart yang?

29. Which herb is more of a heart qi tonic

30. Which herb is better for decreased sensory acuity

Jun 062013
 

Exam

1. The following scenario applies to Questions 1-8:

You get a call from a woman who asks you if you can treat her sister with Chinese herbs; she says the problem is that they are identical twins, but her sister is not behaving identically. You say that you would only take the case if you were treating both of them. The woman on the phone says “Sure, sure, we’ll be there next Tuesday afternoon” and hangs up before you can get her name, number, or even consult your appointment book.
On Tuesday afternoon, the twins walk in. One comes marching up to shake your hand, bellowing in your face “Ready or not, here we come!” while the other hangs back looking fidgety, small and meek. You grab the meek sister, pulling her into the tx room behind you and shutting the door.

Question 1: Once you have closed the door to the tx room, you ask the quiet woman her name. She whispers, “Milly.” You say, “Please have a seat, Milly.” She just smiles apologetically, glances down, and then back at the door. You realize that you have closed the door on her fingers; she can’t move. You open the door, yank her hand out, sit her down, bring ice and check for broken bones. You ask, “Where does it hurt most?” She says, “Oh, it doesn’t really hurt; my fingers are pretty numb. I’m sure it’s really my fault anyway; it was stupid of me to have my fingers in the door frame.” She is pale and washed-out looking.
You already have a suspicion that the base of her formula is going to be a famous combination of four herbs called:


2. What are the ingredients of this formula?

3. Describe what Milly’s pulse and tongue are likely to be, if your diagnosis is correct:

4. Milly’s chief concerns revolve around being a disappointment to her sister Molly;

she says what she wants more than anything else is to be as strong and powerful as her twin. Physically her only concern is that her menstrual flow is very light, and she feels dizzy when she stands up. You decide to go with your initial insight to give her the previously mentioned formula. In 8 Principle/ Zang-Fu terms, what does this mean that your diagnosis is?

5. When it’s Molly’s turn, she essentially harangues you for 15 minutes straight about how unjust it is that even though she and Milly are identical twins, everybody likes Milly much better than herself.

This has been going on as long as she can remember, and it has been a source of seething resentment at the general blindness of the world, and of a long-held grudge against her twin for failing to be similar enough to herself that there will be no discrepancy in their treatment. “Fair is fair, right?” she says.
You ask if she also has physical concerns. She snarls, “No.” Then she thinks about it longer and says, “I toss and turn a lot in my sleep. Milly says she can hear me through the wall. If you could get her to sleep more soundly, that would help me a lot. Also I think there’s something wrong with her sense of smell. My bowel movements are very frequent and loose and she says she feels faint if she uses the same bathroom within an hour of when I’ve been in there.”
Her pulse is slippery, pounding and overflowing especially in the middle and lower positions of the left wrist. What formula do you give her?

6. A month later it is time for the sisters to come back. A confident, somewhat edgy, hassled-looking woman comes in.

You say, “Molly?” She says, “No, Milly. Funny, people never confused us before; now it happens all the time.”
You take her into the tx room and find out that her period this month was distinctly fuller but that she had breast tenderness and cramps, her sleep was deeper, and she is feeling better about herself, but worse about her whole life. She says everything is a hassle, her sister drives her up the wall, and she doesn’t much like the way anyone else in her life treats her, either. She’s frustrated and annoyed most of the time. She says she was better off before she began this crazy herbal scheme. When you take her pulses they are somewhat less thin and much more tense.
You explain that this is a stage in her process, and ask her to try one more month on a modification of the formula that will continue to promote self-esteem and also help her to overcome obstacles causing frustration. She agrees. What Wood formula that opens Liver Qi circulation and also tonifies Blood do you give her?

7. You decide to add one more herb to the formula for gentle qi and blood movement. You add:

8. Later that day one of the twins comes by, with a forceful yet indefinably hesitant step.

You say, “Milly, back again?” She says, “No, it’s me, Molly. What’s your problem- you got anything behind those eyeballs? …or do I have a problem? I can’t decide.”
Once in the tx room, she says “Milly’s formula is great; it’s made her a real bitch, now no one likes to be around her either.” About herself she says, “I don’t think I like this formula; I’m starting to see other people’s point of view a bit more, and from their point of view, I’m pretty obnoxious sometimes. It’s terrible for my self-esteem. Also now that I’m not GLARING at people so hard, I realize that I have floaters in my eyes. I don’t think I want to keep taking this stuff.”
You ask her about her sleep, and her bowels; both have improved significantly. You convince her to try a modification of the formula that will continue these improvements and also build self-esteem. First, there is one ingredient in the formula that you could increase; what is it?

(The next month they call to move their appointments two weeks later because they made a last-minute decision to fly to Paris together, feeling better about themselves and each other than they have in many years. You wonder if by the time they get back they will have any distinguishing characteristics at all.)

9. An emerald green young man comes in saying that his main issue is songwriter’s block; he is a musician in a creative dry spell.

Physically you note that he has dry hair, dry skin and nails, and that he moves very quickly and appears to be restless. He is elegant and sensitive in demeanor until he really gets talking, and then he’s like a machine gun firing off words at breakneck speed, gesturing with his hands with lots of chopping and waving. He has some floaters, which get worse whenever he stays up way too late at night trying to write songs. His pulse is thin tense, and his tongue is red, peeled, thin, with a bit of bluishness in the middle. You think of what formula:

10. He says the dry spell began with a traumatic car accident.

He’s also had a stabbing pain in his lower ribcage since then, in the Liver area, which is where he took the hit when he was thrown from the car. You think of adding two herbs to:

11. For instance you might add:

12. He says that although he was accustom to being a very fast driver in his car, now the phrase “defensive driving” is an understatement to describe his style in traffic.

He is so wary and feels so vulnerable about the possibility of being hit again that he gets muscle cramps when he drives from hunching defensively over the wheel. You think of adding what single herb:

13. The following scenario applies to Questions 13-14:

Your next client is a small woman who sits scrunched into herself (=constraint). She is seeing you because she has migraines so bad that she wants to kill herself. She says that they are like a knife in her head, a terrible stabbing pain (=congealed blood). Her voice is a hopeless clip, like a hammer that hits a nail over and over again, but never hard enough to drive it into the board (= deficiency). Her color is greenish-pale (=blood deficiency). Her pulses are tense (=constraint), agitated (= heat). Her tongue is mostly pale and bluish (=deficiency, constraint) but it is getting peeled and red along the sides (yin deficient heat in the Liver). You ask her what her theory is, as to where the headaches are coming from. She says, “God hates me. I am being tormented (congealed blood) for my sins.”
You ask her softly what are her sins. She says, “I am cruel to my children. When I was a child, my older sister was cruel to me; she would hurt me whenever she could. Now I have these two small children whom I know I should love, and sometimes I do, but mostly all I feel in my heart is anger at my sister which has become a burning knot of hate. I am a terrible person now, like my sister.”
You tell her that you have a formula for her which you believe will help not only her headaches, but also start to heal the scars in her heart. She says, “God will be the judge. I’m willing to try.”

Question 13: You give her a formula called:

14. Within this formula is another famous liver formula (may be a slightly altered version). It is:

15. You lose track of time over lunch, and arrive late for your first visit with a new client.

She is standing outside in the rain waiting for you. You apologize, and she says “Oh, no, I don’t mind at all! I’m happy to wait out in the rain.” She is coming in to you because she has a sensation of something being stuck in her throat. She has had a full medical workup, and her doctors can find no reason for this sensation. She also suffers from asthma, and is frequently coughing up clear, loose phlegm.

Which formula is indicated for this client?

16. True or False: This formula is primarily indicated for Wood CFs and is often a constitutional formula.

17. Which herb is a strong blood mover?

18. Which is more common?

19. How can someone get internal wind?

20. A basic formula for treating wind is an augmented version of which formula?

21. Which formula for liver qi constraint is specific for a VII-IX block (LR 14 to LU1)

22. Zhi ke aurantium husk and zhi shi aurantium both have an ability to help with unbinding when there is liver qi constraint. What is the difference between the two herbs?

23. The following scenario applies to Questions 23-24:

After saying good-bye to your last client, you find two more clients having a huge fight in the waiting room. One is a small man with a flushed red face (= full heat!) who is howling, “It’s my appointment time and you can’t stop me!” Since he is shouting this over and over again with only minor thematic variations, you have time to appreciate the full strength (= excess) of his voice, and the sense of festering belligerence (=damp heat in the Liv/Gall) which letting off steam doesn’t seem to diminish in the least (=excess). He’s almost foaming at the mouth like a rabid dog (= excess!), his eyes are bloodshot (= full heat) and he keeps touching the sides of his head as though it might explode (= excess) when he shouts. Nevertheless you sense that he could keep this up for a very long time (= excess).
The other client is a very tall thin sleekly dressed woman in extremely high dangerous-looking heels who is yelling back at him with a voice like an avalanche in a chopstick factory (= yin deficient shout). She is talking so fast that you actually cannot hear what she is saying, although it is clear that she is objecting to Mr. Belligerent’s point of view. She keeps looking at her wristwatch as she continues to hurl verbal chopsticks at a rapid clip; she never seems to stop for a breath (= Lung yin deficiency). You get the sense that although the sleek thin woman is unable to back down (= Liver yin deficiency), she’s tiring first (= deficiency).

Question 23: The thin woman has tight (= yin deficiency) pulses like a fishing line with a speeding fish on the hook. Her tongue is thin and red on the sides (yin deficient heat in the Liver). Being quiet and breathing is already bringing back her strength (yin deficiency). You give her what formula?

24. Mr. Belligerent’s pulses are pounding (= heat) so hard that you can SEE them on his wrists even before you put down your fingers (= overflowing, full excess!) .

They are slippery (= dampness) as well as huge and forceful (= excess). What formula do you give him?

25. The following scenario applies to Questions 25-26:

A 17 year old female soccer player comes in to see you for menstrual cramps and breast pain. The only thing that helps either of these symptoms is a warm bath. Upon further questioning, you learn that she frequently vomits after she eats, and also suffers from vertex headaches. She has very little appetite, and tends to eat mostly cold salad. During the interview, you ask your client what makes her happy. She is unable to tell you. She just sits there looking hopeless.

Question 25: Which formula is indicated for this client?

26. Which herb in her formula should you be careful to only use for a short period of time?

27. Which one of the following herbs enters the lung channel?

28. Which one of the following herbs is contraindicated in cases of spleen qi deficient diarrhea?

29. Which one of the following herbs is indicated for congealed blood and scar tissue in the heart?

30. Which one of the following herbs clears damp heat and heat toxicity?

Jun 062013
 

Exam

1. Select the herbs that are part of the formula Si Jun Zi Tang Four Gentlemen (select all that apply):

2. Which one of these herbs is the most sweet?

3. Which one of these herbs is best for lack of appetite with tiredness and nausea?

4. Which one of these herbs is most stabilizing?

5. If chen pi tangerine peel and ban xia pinellia were added to Si Jun Zi Tang, making a famous formula called Liu Jun Zi Tang Six Gentlemen. This formula might be for such symptoms as (select ALL that apply):

6. If the client had belching and intestinal cramps as well as a scalloped tongue with a greasy white coat, pulse yielding and slippery, what two ingredients would you add to Liu Jun Zi Tang Six Gentlemen to make another famous formula

(select two from the list below):

7. If the client had plenty of energy and ate nothing but ice cream for 20 years, and now had a heavy, loose cough with profuse white sputum, what two ingredients would you REMOVE from Liu Jun Zi Tang Six Gentlemen to make another famous formula

(select two from the list below):

8. Which one of these herbs would most pertain to a client who had undergone a fraternity initiation requiring that he eat 50 hamburgers in half an hour?

9. Which one of these herbs would be most helpful for someone who sits all day blowing her nose copiously and saying “Duuuhhh….”

10. Which one of these herbs would be most helpful for achieving strong, centered, single-minded focus?

11. Which herb would you give to a client who had painful cramping when she moved her bowels?

12. What is the name of the formula you have learned for Spleen Qi Sinking (Anti-Gravity Formula)?

13. Select the herbs in this formula which Raise the Clear Yang.

14. Name the spleen qi tonic herb in this formula which is most similar in nature to the herbs in the previous question (i.e. has an “up” quality):

15. This formula could be used to help resolve which of the following (select all that apply):

16. Which formula is best for someone with a slippery yet strong pulse?

17. Which is best for someone with a tight pulse?

18. Which is best for someone with cramping diarrhea?

19. Which is best for someone who is flat and exhausted?

20. Which is best for someone with very thick phlegm?

21. Which is best for someone who is weak and stuck with lots of excuses?

22. Which is most moistening?

23. Which is most warming?

24. A client comes in yellow, singing, and a bit groaning.

Her main issue is insomnia. She says her insomnia is characterized by a restless mind that keeps thinking about work—and she actually gets a lot of work done in her mind as she lies in bed, but it’s not helping her level of fatigue. She also notices that the more tired she gets, the more she can’t settle down. You ask about appetite. She is thirsty and hungry, but never actually wants to drink much, and never can figure out exactly what she wants to eat. Sometimes she has no appetite all day until after dark; she goes goes goes all day, then eats when she gets home. Her tongue is reddish, dry and had a crack in the middle; her pulse is tight. You think of what formula:

25. Of the following herbs, which one would you NEVER expect to see added to the above formula under any circumstances?

26. Which is more stabilizing, bai zhu atractylodes or ren shen ginseng?

27. Which is more qi moving, chen pi tangerine peel or fu ling poria?

28. Which is more moistening, shan yao diascorus yam or huang qi astragalus?

29. Which is more warming, LI ZHONG WAN Regulate the Middle or SI JUN ZI TAN 4 Gents?

30. Phlegm is always an excess condition

31. An excess condition and a deficient condition never appear in the same person; or at least not in the same Element

Jun 022013
 

Excerpt: “The Heart and Heart Mediator have a lot of connection. The difference between the Heart and the Heart Mediator is like the line between the sun and the sunlight.”

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Jun 012013
 

Excerpt: “One of the things the things that is difficult about teaching the HM meridian is the issue of understanding the trajectory in terms of a dual direction of flow.”

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May 262013
 
Yu Nu Jian Part One: Hunger and Drama

Thea Elijah describes the Chinese herbal formula Yu Nu Jian.  Part one focuses on shi gao gypsum.

 

Yu Nu Jian Part Two: Power and Desire

Thea Elijah continues with the second part of her discussion of the Chinese herbal formula Yu Nu Jian. Here she focuses on zhi mu annemarrhena.

 

Yu Nu Jian Part Three: Capacity for Satisfaction

This is part three of Thea Elijah’s discussion of the Chinese herbal formula Yu Nu Jian. Here she focuses on mai men dong ophiopogon.

 

Yu Nu Jian Part Four: Deep Quenching and Rooting In Strength

This is the fourth part of Thea Elijah’s discussion of Yu Nu Jian. Here she focuses on mai men dong ophiopogon and shi di huang rehmannia and niu xi achyranthus.

 

Yu Nu Jian Part Five: Hungry Ghosts

This is part five of Thea Elijah’s discussion of the Chinese herbal formula Yu Nu Jian. Here she discusses the implications of living with a sense of deprivation.

 

Yu Nu Jian 6 deprivation and fasting

This is part three of Thea Elijah’s discussion of the Chinese herbal formula Yu Nu Jian. Here she discusses the transformation of virtue of the formula, and how to live well by “fasting” when we don’t get what we need.

 

May 262013
 

In this video, Thea talks about this formula in terms of people for whom nothing is good enough, and when longing for something, they may be visualizing an idealization of that thing. It’s about looking for Heaven, through something else.  Watch Mai Men Dong Tang, Part 1:

In Part 2, Thea discusses this formula in terms of a fullness that can only come about through an emptiness.

May 262013
 

We all have all five of the elements, and we all have them each in our own style. They are distributed differently in each of us, and in a way that is uniquely balanced.

May 262013
 

Thea Elijah speaks about the nature of Metal: “edges,” individuality, and sacrifice for the greater good of the whole.

Apr 212013
 

Understanding What Herbs “Do”

Herb Intro:  Gan Dong and Heart Voice

How Chinese Herbs Work

Spirit of the Herbs:  SI Style

Who’s Invited to Herb Class

Herb Intro:  Dosage is a Mystical Art

Apr 092013
 

What makes a good beginning?  The months of spring are said to be the months of fa and chen which are beginning, but it’s two characters for beginning.  For the Chinese, beginning actually has two parts.  There’s fa which shows a kind of bursting up through the soil.  And then there’s chen which shows a kind of spreading out kind of quality.

Read “What Makes a Good Beginning”  (8-page pdf)

 

Wood is about the power of movement and cessation, not the power of impulsiveness and uptightness. What would it feel like to be free? What if I were to heal? What would that look like? What’s that going to feel like? Can I open to a future in which I am healed?
Spring is the time for letting my mind, my imagination, go forward even more, with the power of the hun. The power of the Wood element is to fly into the future and then come back again, bringing us a vision.
After the fa comes the chen, this spreading. This is how it’s going to be! Not only am I fully healed, but I’m free. I’m free of the past, and I’m free to walk into the future.

Read “Healing and Freedom”  (5-page pdf)

 

The left wrist middle position has to do with me being able to stand fully in what I am — because without me standing fully in what I am, especially when I see it differently than you do, then there would be no dance. This is what goes on in Wood, the capitol city of the left wrist: endless meetings, pivots, endless points at which everything I have ever been and every experience I have ever had until now, comes to this point of meeting everything you have ever been or experienced, up until now. From here, what could happen? I won’t know unless I am really fully here, meeting you in the capitol city of the left wrist.

Read “Left Wrist, Middle Position”  (6-page pdf)

 

Growth is a very particular type of change. Growth is not “How am I going to accommodate to this situation?”  Growth means: as a result of being in this situation, there’s going to be more of me out in the world, living. To understand the transformation from anger to constructiveness, it helps to understand something about plants and growth.  Growth is always towards the light.  You never see a plant growing towards the dark, ever. We grow from the dark.   Anger in its healthy essence is the sense of “Hey, there could be some momentum here, and I don’t think what we are doing now is moving towards the light.”  Well okay, in that moment of recognizing that this aspect of a situation isn’t moving towards the light, are you moving towards the light?  The deep arousal of anger in the spirit of growth towards the light is what makes heroes.

The word for the virtue of Wood, which I have been translating as Constructiveness or Heroism, is usually translated as Benevolence. I think that’s a lousy translation; it does not convey the spirit of the word.  Even though I am using different words to translate the Chinese character, I’m trying to be true to what Confucius was talking about. The character shows a person, and the number two. It’s being two-eyed.  It is exemplified by eyesight, or rather is it exemplified by vision.

Read “Growth, Anger, Direction, and Benevolence”  (9-page pdf)

 

Healthy planning and decision-making have a number of different aspects worth exploring in detail. The most basic differentiation worth considering is between the two primary Wood element questions: “Where am I going?” and “How am I going to get there?”

Read “Plans and Decisions” (5-page pdf)

Apr 012013
 

Excerpt:  “Horary Points are the “same Element” points within each meridian, if used either 1) during the 2-hour solar time of its increased circulation, or 2) during its corresponding season.

It is most especially powerful when they are used during both at the same time, i.e. the time of increased circulation during the season of correspondence. It places the Element within a person into the context of the Element in nature.

We will look at the nature of Horary points in general, and then speak at least briefly about each of the Horary points on the 12 primary meridians. Point names and alternate point names will be considered for their associated meanings.”

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Mar 252013
 

Excerpt: “Here is the heart of my approach to teaching 5 element herbal studies. Included is a description of the difference between working with herbs from the paradigm of Western medicine, Chinese medicine, and Shamanism..”

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Feb 272013
 

In Practice #1 we will explore what it means to be in your body, and how to tell if you aren’t.  We will swap notes on different ways of “coming home.”

Topics include: the difference between dissociation and inhibition, shame and body image, immunology, balancing qi and blood, and learning to dance.

What Does It Mean To Be In Your Body (3 page pdf)

On the Computer, In My Body: Part One (3 page pdf)

On the Computer, In My Body: Part Two (2 page pdf)

Indoor/Outdoor Body (3 page pdf)

Full Body Face – Before a Partner Exercise (1 page pdf)

Full Body Face  (Audio 2:27)

Being and Doing: The Balance of Qi and Blood (1 page pdf)

Si Wu Tang (You Tube videos)

If You Can Walk (1 page pdf)

Body Image, Body Shame, Body Mystery Part One-Aging (2 page pdf)

Body Image, Body Shame, Body Mystery Part Two: Coming of Age (2 page pdf)

I Already Know This – The Practice Upgrade (2 page pdf)

 
Feb 202013
 
Whole Heart Connection Integration – Online Class Materials
The documents below are Thea Elijah’s Whole Heart Connection (formerly “Medicine Without Form”) articles specifically tailored for post-Intro class review, and to help integrate the practices into daily life.  These are also for use with her online Integration 12-week course.

Practice #1: In Your Body
Practice #2: Trust – The Physiology of Perception             
Practice #3: Sheriff of Love, Part 1
Practice #4: Sheriff of Love, Part 2
Practice #5: Front Body and Back Body
Practice #6: Speaking in Heart Voice
Practice #7: Light Coming Through
Practice #8: Thinking vs. Feeling vs. Heart Void
Practice #9: Me First: The Cup That Runneth Over
Practice #10: Loss of Heart and Self-Healing

 

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PRACTICE #1:  Are You In Your Body?

In Practice #1 we will explore what it means to be in your body, and how to tell if you aren’t. We will swap notes on different ways of “coming home.” Topics include: the difference between dissociation and inhibition, shame and body image, immunology, balancing qi and blood, and learning to dance.

Material for Practice #1 
What Does It Mean To Be In Your Body (3 page pdf)
On the Computer, In My Body Part One (3 page pdf)
On the Computer, In My Body Part Two  (2 page pdf)
Indoor Outdoor Body (3 page pdf)
Full Body Face Before a Partner Exercise (1 page pdf)
Full Body Face Audio (Audio 2:27)
Being and Doing The Balance of Qi and Blood(1 page pdf)
Si Wu Tang Part One (on youtube, and parts Two through Six can be accessed there also)
If You Can Walk(1 page pdf)
Body Image,Body Shame and Body Mystery Part One Aging (2 page pdf)
Body Image,Body Shame and Body Mystery Part Two Coming of Age (2 page pdf)
Relaxed or Casual (Audio 2:57)
 
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 PRACTICE #2  The Physiology of Perception

In Practice #2 we will work with opening perception through learning how to shift our bodies into the state of trust (trust the chair, the ground, the bed, the river, the Tao).
Topics include: what is rest, contacting the parasympathetic nervous system, distinguishing between casualness and relaxation, trust and “other people.”

Trust the Chair Trust the Fish (3 page pdf)
Kidney Points for Non Acupuncturists  (1 page pdf)
Kidney 8 Excerpt   (6 page pdf)
What is Safety (2 page pdf)
The Skill of Rest (4 page pdf)
 
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PRACTICE #3  Sheriff of Love, Part One

In Practice #3 we will focus on fully claiming our sovereignty in “our town,” and not waiting for others to give us permission to be welcome.  We offer permission to others, welcoming them into a new standard of politeness:  health.  Topics include:  entering new situations, meeting new people, new people entering established groups, shifting ourselves within long-standing relationships or situations.

Legitimacy (audio 21:38)
Legitimacy Exercise (2 page pdf)
Sheriff of Anything Transition from Practice 2 to Practice 3 (5 page pdf)
Sheriff of Love Part One (2 page pdf)
 
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PRACTICE #4  Sheriff of Love, Part Two

In Practice #4 we will deepen our relationship with heart-through-pelvis into legs and feet taking root in common ground.  Topics include:  Feeling your tool belt, infinite weight and height, being a community resource vs. “too much,” empowering instead of intimidating/ being intimidated.

Domineering and Empowerment, part 1 (audio 5:36)
Domineering and Empowerment, part 2 (audio 5:54)
 
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PRACTICE #5  Front Body and Back Body

In Practice #5 we will develop our awareness of our back body and front body in ourselves and in relationship with others.  Topics include: bonding and individuation, “who’s got your back,” back of the heart, sacrum and heels, head on two legs, back of the head/neck alignment.

Back to the Wall  (audio 24:31)
Back to the Wall Exercise (2 page pdf)
Back Body Village Exercise  (6 page pdf)
Front and Back and Side, part 1 of 3 (audio 8:53)
Front and Back and Side, part 2 of 3 (audio 13:11)
Front and Back and Side, part 3 of 3 (audio 7:27)
Safety and the Front Body (audio 5:02)
 
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 PRACTICE #6   Speaking in Heart Voice

In Practice #6 we will practice speaking in heart voice, with special attention to how much we can “max out” on opening the back and front of the heart (as well as opening all the way down and all the way up).  Topics include:  “maxing out” on hearing ourselves being heard, and speaking directly into the listening (pacing is love).

 Heart and Speaking In Heart Space (2 page pdf)
Speaking From the Heart  (3 page pdf)
Unclenching the Heart (4 page pdf)
Heart Voice (Audio 6:31)
 
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 PRACTICE #7  Light Coming Through

In Practice #7 we will surrender to the pleasures of being Light Coming Through a woman or man, and connecting with the light coming through others—no matter what they show us in their eyes, we will acknowledge it, but give their name to the light.  Topics include:  people we dislike, parts of ourselves we dislike, heart love and connection vs. personal love and connection.

Light Coming Through (9 page pdf)
Donut Hole – Light Coming Through (Audio 22:13)
 
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 PRACTICE #8

In Practice #8 we will practice the distinctions between thinking about someone, feeling in response to them, and making infinite space in heart void to hold them and know them in that extended light.  We will practice each of these states as separate, and also work with common combinations.  Topics include:  dealing with “difficult” people, openness vs. vulnerability, spacious connection with those closest to us.

Thinking, Feeling, Void (Audio 15:09)
Think-Feel-Void Transcript (4 page pdf)
Think-Feel-Void Teaching Outline (1 page pdf)
The Donut Hole Goes Through Both Ways (Audio 4:00)
 
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 PRACTICE #9

In Practice #9 we will deepen our capacity to ask and receive through the back of the heart, for the sake of being able to give more than we have to give.  Topics include: not living on a starvation diet, using our sense of inadequacy to access the infinite, balancing generosity with “richness” from beyond ourselves, complete surrender to receiving fully while giving.

Inadequacy / Cup Runneth Over (5 page pdf)
Inadequacy / Cup Runneth Over (Audio 19:49)
 
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 PRACTICE #10   Loss of Heart and Self Healing

 In Practice #10 we will develop our shamelessly compassionate awareness of our own times and places of loss of heart, and recognize these as moments for self-healing.  Topics  include: despair and soldiering on, “bank vault” statements, asking and basking in the heart, self-healing practices.

Healing Despair: (Audio  25:08)
The Heart and Loss of Heart  (3 page pdf)
Basking and Asking(Audio  9:34)
Self-Healing part 1 (Audio  10:09)
Self-Healing part 2:  (Audio  10:07)
Back to Back Healing:    (Audio  19:14)
Extensive Self-Healing:  (Audio 20:32)
Flower and Sun:   (Audio 27:25 )
The Nature of Healing: (1 page pdf)
Space for Myself in My Own Heart:  (Audio  5:49 )
Unhappiness and Loss of Heart   (8 page pdf)
When Healing Hurts Too Much:    (1 page pdf)
 
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Feb 182013
 

In Practice #2 we will work with opening perception through learning how to shift our bodies into the state of trust (trust the chair, the ground, the bed, the river, the Tao).

Topics include: what is trust, what is rest, contacting the parasympathetic nervous system, distinguishing between casualness and relaxation, trust and “other people.”

Trust the Chair, Trust the Fish (3 page pdf)

Trust: We are the Tao  (3 page pdf)

Kidney 8 Excerpt  (5 page pdf)

The Skill of Rest (4 page pdf)

 

Feb 172013
 

In Practice #3 we will focus on fully claiming our sovereignty in “our town,” and not waiting for others to give us permission to be welcome. We offer permission to others, welcoming them into a new standard of politeness: health.

Topics include: entering new situations, meeting new people, new people entering established groups, shifting ourselves within long-standing relationships or situations.

Legitimacy  (audio 21:46)

Legitimacy Exercise  (2 page pdf)

Sheriff of Anything: Transition from Practice 2 to Practice 3  (4 page pdf) 

 

Feb 152013
 

In Practice #5 we will develop our awareness of our back body and front body in ourselves and in relationship with others.

Topics include: bonding and individuation, “who’s got your back,” back of the heart, sacrum and heels, head on two legs, back of the head/neck alignment.

Back to the Wall  (audio 24:40)

Back to the Wall Exercise (2 page pdf)

Back Body Village Exercise  (6 page pdf)

Front and Back and Side: Part One (audio 8:56)

Front and Back and Side: Part Two (audio 13:16)

Front and Back and Side: Part Three (audio 7:297)

Safety and the Front Body (audio 5:03)

 
Feb 152013
 

(Part 1 of 6) Thea teaches us how Si Wu Tang tonifies Liver Blood.  From the Spirit of the Herbs series.

Feb 152013
 

(Part 2 of 6) Thea teaches us how Si Wu Tang tonifies Liver Blood, from the Spirit of the Herbs series.

Feb 152013
 

(Part 3 of 6) Thea teaches us how Si Wu Tang tonifies Liver Blood, from the Spirit of the Herbs series.

Feb 152013
 

(Part 4 of 6) Thea teaches us how Si Wu Tang tonifies Liver Blood, from the Spirit of the Herbs series.