Welcome to The Me-First School of Global Healing

A blog dedicated to exploring the experience of healing in all domains

Exit-Entry Blocks–Re-opening the Doors of Knowing

Exit-Entry Blocks:Re-opening the Doors of Knowing Here’s an acupuncture-related post, but remember, you all have fingers—you can treat yourselves any time! There is a difference between cognition and knowing. Cognition is a process of working with input in order to get to clarity. With cognition, we go through a process of arriving at knowing, and we can tell that we’ve gone through a process. At other times, we seem to arrive instantly at the knowing. Usually, there was a process; it was just so swift and efficient and transparent that we don’t notice it. Both of these processes—cognition and the seemingly instantaneous knowing—are important for us to look at, and to be able to troubleshoot. We do this by assessing the ... Read more

March 3, 2020

Some Thoughts About Points and Needling I am preparing to teach a class called Needling From the Heart, and of course, I have my Whole Heart Acupuncture series coming up (with extra clinical mentorship on the Mondays), so the nature of acupuncture points is very much on my mind. Acupuncturists treat points with needles, but we all have acupuncture points, so this is a thought piece for everyone. What is an Acupuncture Point? An acupuncture point is a place of communication with deep eternal realities that transcend our individual lives. They are also, on an individual level, repositories of lies and contradictions, obfuscations or discouragements or puzzlement (or horror or agony) around the thematic content of the point. The points are like a ... Read more

February 13, 2020

Middle-Aged White Woman Teaching Asian Medicine Is it cultural appropriation for Westerners to practice Chinese medicine? How about Westerners teaching Chinese medicine? How about innovating new practices, new perspectives, new Western adaptations or sub-modalities that owe their origins to Chinese medicine? These are important questions, and they must be ongoing questions. It seems likely that the short answer is that yes, this is cultural appropriation—but then, having made this determination, what is our next step? Surely it is not for all Westerners to stop receiving, practicing, and sharing Chinese medicine. How do we engage that which our culture did not create in a way that is respectful and generative, as a gift rather than a theft? There are many pathways to explore ... Read more